Carl Orff stated that "Dance has the closest relationship to music. My idea and the task that I set myself was a regeneration of music through movement, through dance." Later, he added that rhythm is difficult to teach, expressed only by "releasing" it. Anne Green Gilbert , who developed Brain Danc e, noted the connections between dance and human growth and development. Two Orff educators, Jenny Burnett and Laura Webster, wrote an article for the Orff Echo describing how to use movement to teach concepts (Orff Echo , Vol. 42, No. 4 ). Finally, as noted on this blog post on Walkabout , movement is a crucial tool in social emotional development, which is probably needed more now than in past decades. There's an issue: I KNOW some of you are thinking that it's tough enough to keep kids distanced from each other, much less let them move around the room! Non-locomotor ideas to the rescue. These ideas can be be used to reinforce concepts, expression, mindfulnes...
  As I type this, many of my music teacher friends and relatives are living through the planning or first day stages of distance learning experiences. Life has changed with plastic panels, new sit spots six feet apart (if you're lucky enough to either have classes split or a large class), or new experiences on a cart. OR, you are navigating through recording your lessons and working around various online activities. This is part two of a   three-part blog series collecting various  tip Memes of the Day on my  Facebook page ,  Instagram,  and  Twitter.   Because I'm retired, I've wanted to help, so I began posting these memes, but then realized having all of them in one place might be nice. Distance Learning Memes, Part 1 Distance Learning Memes,  Part 3 Part 2 Use Puppy Pads for Condensation.  Honestly, I can't remember where I read this, but it's genius. We had a package we never really used because our "adopted as grown" dog didn't need them, but the...
Right now, many of you have already started school. Some are still waiting, because your district might have postponed the start of school, hoping to provide staff more time to prepare. Some of you are fulltime in the classroom. Some of you are doing virtual teaching. Some of you are on a hybrid schedule. Some of you have been moved out of your rooms and onto a cart. Some of you have masks only. Some of you have shields. I'm willing to bet, however, you all are just a little stressed. This is part three of a   three-part blog series collecting various  tip Memes of the Day on my  Facebook page ,  Instagram,  and  Twitter.   Because I'm retired, I've wanted to help, so I began posting these memes, but then realized having all of them in one place might be nice. This third set is going to focus on YOU, and how you can care for yourself. Distance Learning Memes, Part 1 Distance Learning Memes,  Part 2 Part  3 Find an Easy Place to Dump Your Thoughts Music teachers are famous f...
       I am going to be honest: I have felt pretty helpless as my former colleagues are planning, worrying, buying, and collaborating to prepare for.....well, "How long will we be in the building?" "How long will we be virtual?" "How do I keep kids at a distance?"        It's not much, but I decided to provide a tip Meme of the Day on my Facebook page , Instagram,  and Twitter.  However, I started realizing that having all those memes in one place might be nice, so I wrote three posts to cover these issues. Part 1 Use SeeSaw or another video platform to sing your morning song to your kids. As teachers, we know how crucial routine is to our students. One of the biggest debates on school versus virtual is getting students back on a regular schedule. There is good and not so good on both sides. But, if you are going virtual, there is no reason why you cannot continue a morning song or teach a new one. SeeSaw has video capabilities to allow you to reach y...
First published on May 11, 2020 This has been a rough, rough 2-3 months for the world. And, in the United States, citizens had to adapt in a myriad of ways in order to protect themselves and their loved ones from the coronovirus Covid-19. As you know, teachers have had to immediately learn how to provide instruction remotely, adapting on the fly, while they and their students stayed at home during the social/physical distancing requirements. For music teachers in particular, the challenge was augmented because of the performance aspect of the discipline. It was not easy for students to "musick" over Zoom or other platforms. And, according to the CDC  guidlines, re-entry into the school building does not mean that life is "back to normal". I want to share some thoughts that, although maybe a little jumbled, reflect what I would be thinking if I was still teaching. I definitely think these in my new position as a church music director. One item of particular conce...
I'm bringing this back , because I feel music teachers, actually all teachers, need extra emotional support as the COVID battle continues. Even though I'm retired, I am feeling the pain for you. I know your worries, your frustrations, your concerns, your fears. And I am going to fight for teachers in whatever way I can. Originally published on 9/24/17 This isn't exactly the blog I had planned, but it hits home. I've been behind lately because the realities of teaching this year have put me in a tired mood when I get home. And, I've noticed it quite a bit on posts in music educator Facebook groups lately. The wonder about exhaustion. The frustrations with new and differing forms of classroom management issues. The feeling of loneliness and lack of respect because the music teacher is most likely the only one of that discipline in a building. New requirements for teachers on top of what feelings like growing animosity towards teachers. Not to mention outside str...