Several months ago, I wrote about keeping kids moving in the classroom. Believe it or not, keeping kids moving within certain parameters actually cuts down on classroom management issues, keeps them engaged, and helps the brain. Well, now, of course, is spring. It's early spring, and it might be a while before some of you will be able to take your students outside. SHOULD you take your students outside? Why not? It's a change of pace for you and for them. It helps them learn how to work in an even less restrictive environment. It can help with frayed nerves. It's good for them physically and mentally. It's good for YOU. These are the types of things I would do with my classes outside: DRUMMING This had to be the absolute favorite of my students. Usually, I wouldn't start this until second grade so they would be big enough to help carry the drums out.  I woud plan the following activities: Question/answer Call/response Echo Grooves I discovered the students benefitte...
Change Sings by Amanda Gorman   As teachers, we know how important it is to provide opportunities for social-emotional learning and development in a child the fact that they can make a difference in the world. One young lady has done that and has inspired adults, and this book can inspire kids as well. Amanda Gorman is not only the youngest poet who has recited her poem at the U.S. inauguration but is also the first youth Poet Laureate in the United States. She was raised by a single mom who was an English teacher and has revealed she has an auditory processing disorder and speech disorder. To practice her speech development, she sang.  Your students with various abilities can probably relate to the struggles of overcoming speech issues.  But to the book..... The illustrations by Loren Long are fabulous. Gorman refers to singing often. Another great aspect of the book that is unique to music is Long's use of musical instruments in the illustrations and the mentioning of diversity b...